PUBLICATIONS

IN VIVO IMAGING OF EPITHELIAL WOUND HEALING IN THE CNIDARIAN CLYTIA HEMISPHAERICA DEMONSTRATES EARLY EVOLUTION OF PURSE STRING AND CELL CRAWLING CLOSURE MECHANISMS

We identified cell crawling and purse string-mediated mechanisms of healing in Clytia epithelium that appear highly analogous of those seen in higher animals, suggesting that these mechanisms may have emerged in a common ancestor. Interestingly, we found that epithelial wound healing in Clytia is 75 to >600 times faster than in cultured cells or embryos of other animals previously studied, suggesting that Clytia may provide valuable clues about optimized healing efficiency. Finally, in Clytia, we show that damage to the basement membrane in a wound gap causes a rapid shift between the cell crawling and purse string mechanisms for wound closure. This is consistent with work in other systems showing that cells marginal to a wound choose between a super-cellular actin cable or lamellipodia formation to close wounds, and suggests a mechanism underlying this decision.

PRESENTATIONS

"Understanding Speech Patterns During Delays in Life Saving Interventions"  Philadelphia,  PA  2021

Presented and was one of two winners at the Drexel College for Computing & Informatics Doctoral Student Association Research Symposium.

"WOUND HEALING IN JELLYFISH"  CHICAGO, IL, 2016

Presented at the Undergraduate Research Sympsoium for the Midstates Consortium for Math and Science,